Tag Archives: screenwriting

Recombined Shoot

As I described in my post Movie to Books to Movie to TV, I’ve been working with director Regina Ainsworth with an eye toward pitching my young adult sci-fi novels, the Tankborn trilogy, as a television series. Regina suggested we needed a visual … Continue reading

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Fake Blood and Shooting After Dark–the Making of a Vampire Flick

At this point in my career, I’m a dedicated novelist. I’m sticking to writing and promoting my traditionally published books like the Tankborn Trilogy and the upcoming Janelle Watkins mysteries, as well as my indie published romances. But there was … Continue reading

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Subtext–When Your Characters Don’t Say What They Mean, or Mean What They Say

There’s a concept I’ve mainly seen in screenwriting called “on the nose” dialogue. That’s dialogue in which there is no subtext, in which a character baldly says exactly what they’re feeling inside. What’s the problem with this? First, in the … Continue reading

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Embryonic TANKBORN (How a Script Became a Book, Part 2)

Screenwriting is an entirely different world than the publishing world. The most obvious difference is the format–a script looks entirely different from a book manuscript. In a film script, dialogue is set off in blocks with wider margins. The dialogue … Continue reading

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Embryonic TANKBORN (How a Script Became a Book, Part 1)

I think the question authors are asked most often is “Where do you get your ideas?” Unless I’m being flip (“Mail order. Three for a buck for the hackneyed ones, a couple hundred for a really stellar concept), I find … Continue reading

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